Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Hold up there, Andrea...

Getting ahead of yourself, aren't you?

Given the lack of mention by any of the OLP candidates in regard to forming a "coalition" with the New Democrats, I assume this has been something cooking up within Horwath's head. What does she think she'll get out of it? Sharing the unpopularity of the governing Liberals?

That must be the biggest point here - why!?? If I were an NDP operative or supporter right now, I would ask that over and over again. Given the absolute doldrums the Ontario Liberals are currently in, and the huge strides the provincial NDP have made recently thanks to our drop, what sense does it make to strike up some sort of coalition deal? The NDP would be better served by either pushing for an election right away, thereby depriving a new leader the chance of making any sort of significant decision; or allowing the government to bumble along and collect more dirt, and solidifying their new voters.

The thing not to do is associate your party and your leadership with that of a very unpopular government right now.

Am I not seeing this right, or has Horwath lost it?

10 comments:

  1. Not sure what she's thinking, but if one of her team is ready to jump ship to give the new Premier a majority (it only takes one), she can keep her team together and get them all a seat at the table by forming a coalition. The alternative for her might not be an election; it might be losing a member of her team and giving the new Premier a majority.

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    1. Hm, good point. I didn't think of that. I wonder who would be willing to jump ship?

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  2. Why risk 0 NDP government after the next election when you could probably get 40% of your platform done in a coalition right now?

    An outright coalition is silly, but a 2 year long "deal" is something I'd strongly back.

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  3. It could be that Horwath is looking beyond poll numbers and looking for the best way to get NDP policies implemented. Forcing an immediate election is not likely to get NDP policies implemented, especially considering that an election now has a good chance of electing a Tory majority.

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  4. Maybe they can get some of their policies initiated, but there is no way the Liberals won't use that to better their own image at the same time.

    Plus, the NDP has benefited wildly from teacher support, as they abandoned the Liberals; why would the risk working with the devil now, and alienate their new supporters? Why associate yourselves with a toxic government?

    The Liberals would have the most to gain from this, because they're going to be in control still, and they'll have the opportunity to continue to govern and allow the new leader time to make their own mark, and move past the current scandals. The NDP may get a chance to implement their policies, but a revitalized Liberal regime will work to ensure the credit is at the very least shared.

    There are little benefits to the NDP, as I see them.

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  5. I think Horwath was just responding to questions put to her by the media. The rumour that Wynne was considering a coalition should she win the OLP leadership made the rounds on Twitter over the last day or two and the press picked it up. Should Horwath have ruled out a deal that no one's actually offered her yet? Instead, she kept all her options open which was probably wise for now.

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  6. "but a revitalized Liberal regime will work to ensure the credit is at the very least shared."

    With Horwath I've always had the impression that she's more interested in implementing good policies than who gets credit for them. But this is all idle specualation anyway. But like others have said, why would Horwath rule out a deal that no one has actually offered her?

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    1. Because... it's a stupid idea. I'd rule it out if it was me, or at least say, "at this stage we're not considering anything of the sort."

      There are much better ways to say you *may* go into a coalition, than coming out and saying, I'm open to a coalition.

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  7. Look at what's happening in the UK. Both the LibDems and Conservatives are using each other, but, working with each other.

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    1. And one of them has entirely collapsed as a result, and the other is having their vote siphoned off by another party.

      Yeah, good results there.

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