Tuesday, July 3, 2012

Fun with Google Maps

Teddy here again. In my spare time, I like to make political and politically-related maps on Google Maps. I have more than just the Quebec Senate Divisions. I decided that I should share some of my work.


First, this is the Partition of Israel/Palestine in 1948
CLICK FOR MAP


This is a Public Transit related map (I have a lot of these) showing the approximate fare zones for GO Transit
CLICK FOR MAP
While the map is approximate, old, and unfinished, many have found it useful as GO itself does not make such maps available to the public.


This is a map of many of the floodways and floodbarriers in Manitoba
CLICK FOR MAP


This is a map of Canada's Demographics, I use it to help explain the regional tensions to people who do not know much about Canadian Politics.
CLICK FOR MAP


This is the rough dividing line between Acadian and Anglo areas of New Brunswick
CLICK FOR MAP
Given the recent redistribution, I thought it would be wise to share this map as well.


Back in 1905, Alberta and Saskatchewan were almost created as one, not two, provinces. Here is a map of said proposed province.
CLICK FOR MAP


Unlike most of the maps here, this one has been reproduced by many many people, not just me. It is a map of the ridings in the GTA. (federal)
CLICK FOR MAP


As Canadians, we have a general "feel" for how big our major cities are, but how do they compare to other cities, such as those in the United States?
CLICK FOR MAP
This map tries to answer that.


This is kind of a fun map, where we sell Alberta for New York (among others)
CLICK FOR MAP


Lastly, with all the talk in Toronto of a One City plan replacing the old Transit City plan (as opposed to the Ford City plan) I decided to make my own Teddy City plan, visible here.
CLICK FOR MAP


Creating your own Google Maps maps can be surprisingly fun! I hope you all enjoyed this lite fluff piece.

6 comments:

  1. The purple section that includes Montreal looks like a shark jumping to the east to swallow PEI (that looks like a little fish).

    Laughed when I saw it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Above comment for the fourth map (Canadian demographics)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Canadian demographics - 23 + 11.5 + 8.5 = 43 million Canadians. I think that's about 10 million too high.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Replies
    1. I've edited the description on the population map, and, modified the borders slightly so they do not look like sharks. Should be clearer now.

      Delete
  5. I've added the Oil Patch to the Buffalo map, for reference.

    ReplyDelete