Monday, April 4, 2011

Quick Impressions of the Lib Platform

With the release of the platform, I spent the better part of yesterday, thanks to my lovely sickness and horrible weather, reading what I could about what it is exactly that the Liberal Party plans on presenting to the Canadian public. And it goes without saying that I'm super impressed.

The fact is, the Liberal platform, and how its been laid out in Liberal.ca, is one that's clearly targeted towards the average middle-class voter between the ages of 18 and 65. A broad spectrum, to be sure, but the Liberals also don't pull any punches; they attack the Conservatives at every turn, while delivering a knockout blow with their own spending and program priorities on the economy, on families, on the environment, on democracy and accountability, and on our place in the world. It's a wonderful document in its full, 93-page glory as well, if you want to spend a lot of time reading, mind you.

But what really surprises me about this platform is how well its been targeted, specifically towards those in my age and income bracket, as well as those with my prospective outlook, specifically wanting to go to college and/or university. The Learning Passport is a big part of that; while personally my family is well off enough to pay for my education, this isn't true for a lot of people I know and talk to every day. For me, the idea of a party specifically reaching out to help me with one of the biggest decisions and concerns in my life is exactly what I want to see in our politics. It's not that parties haven't talked about our education before, but the Liberals are making it a priority - and I appreciate being prioritized.

Other than that, I can't really say much that isn't covered by others in the media or here on Liblogs. The budget is a well made document, the product of two years worth of consultation, and I'm proud to have been apart of it, especially during Canada @ 150. I like pretty much all the proposals, especially those promising a more democratic and accountable system of governance, which is something we direly need in this country right now, at all levels of government. In fact, say what you will about the McGuinty Liberals, but they're a very open bunch when it comes to getting down to the riding level, talking to constits and volunteers and interest groups. They listen, even if its not always very well, but they try. I like the idea that the Ignatieff Liberals are planning on doing the same. Bravo.

6 comments:

  1. "A knockout blow".

    Wow, thats funny.

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  2. The 1993 Liberal Red book contained two huge whoppers.
    Eliminating the GST, and NAFTA.

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  3. If the Liberal's new national cap-and-trade scheme goes ahead, you can kiss Alberta good bye.

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  4. Leeky Sweek said.. "If the Liberal's new national cap-and-trade scheme goes ahead, you can kiss Alberta good bye." Ahem, Alberta has been a Tory voting monolith since 1979. Though it would be nice if the Lib's could make inroads it is... at this juncture, unrealistic. No different then Quebec, they are a single party, single interest bloc when it comes to voting. Really, Iggy has nothing to lose by backing sound environmental policies. They are right for the land, our health, and the future.

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  5. "Iggy has nothing to lose by backing sound environmental policies. They are right for the land, our health, and the future."

    That's a tad pretentious.

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  6. @ Leeky Sweek,
    Pretentious? Fair enough. But so is running up a $16B structural deficit before piling on another $39B & then telling me you're a fiscal Conservative! Bottom line, Iggy's platform is the most egalitarian of all the ideas before us... is it Alberta-resource-o-centric? No. Is is fair & Cdn centric? IMHO, Yes. Now we can disagree on my assertion...but I ask what "national vision" is Harper offering? To my aging eyes, not much.

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