Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Liberals don't need to win on the economy - we just need to seem credible

Steve V hits the nail right on the head. The Liberals don't need to "win" on the economic issue, we simply need to pull up with the Conservatives. If we can do that, it's not hard to then direct voter's attention to other, more pertinent issues, like healthcare, education, and controlling our spending, things that the Conservatives have little to no credibility on, and something we can easily usurp if we tried.

That being said, it's not as easy as it seems. While Ignatieff's team is out there, pumping up our economic credentials and trying to get the message out there to various groups and business clubs, we're not doing much else to get the message to the public themselves. We have to remember that every person on one of those board meetings has the same vote as anyone else in Canada. And in all honesty, there's a heck of a lot more average Joes out there than there is business leaders, even counting the various influences people can have. In order for the Liberals to pull up with the Conservatives on the economic front, and present ourselves as credible on this issue, we need to get the message out now.

Canadians will realize that having a government that is good on the economic issues, but also works for Canadians and their needs, versus a government good on the economy but neglecting citizens, is a much better, safer, and more productive choice for our future.

10 comments:

  1. I agree the Liberals need be seen as credible. At the ballot in 2010-2011 we will have another reminder. I have predicted another drop of 1-3% in popular support from 2008 for LPOC. You?

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  2. Canadians will realize that having a government that is good on the economic issues, but also works for Canadians and their needs, versus a government good on the economy but neglecting citizens, is a much better, safer, and more productive choice for our future.

    And that is why the Tories are going to win the next election - again.

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  3. CS,

    I predict a similar standing to 2006, with the Cons around 35-36%, Libs 29-30%, Bloc it's usual 10% and NDP sitting around 16%, and a marginal increase for the Greens. The polls all trend toward this, and barring any future complications (an entire possibility, to be sure), it seems to be heading there.

    Glenn,

    We shall see about that. ;)

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  4. can't say I disagree. Just wish Iggy saw the CPC as the problem and not the NDP. Be nice to hear some ideas come from Iggy.

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  5. So steal the Harper governments economic policy,
    steal the 2008 NDP 'no corp tax cut' policy,
    and re-promise policy that 3 majority Liberal govts with 6 back to back surplus' didn't achieve...
    I thought your leader was an ideas guy.

    So it appears Liberals are going to fight a federal election by dictating policy to the Premiers, rather than take on the government.

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  6. You are ignoring the most recent general election and by election result in 2009 as a barometer but refer to unscientific voluntary polls?

    You are aware every Pollster under polled the CPC in 2008 by more than a couple of points. Many of them overstated the support for Liberals, NDP and Greens.

    I find the omission of FACTS a pattern for those cite the magic 8-Ball about the future. The membership and fundraising don't support any mythical resurgence or a four per cent increase from the last general election.

    In 2009 the Liberals were not competitive in any of the contests.

    In 2010 holding on their seat in Vaughan appears to be their hopes.

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  7. CS,

    I do not ignore 2008, but I think we will do better than it. I do not ignore September 2009, but I believe we've learned from it. And for all the "voluntary unscientific polls" you rattle on about, your claims are certainly no more "scientific" than they are. Unless I'm mistake, comebacks are possible, and trends can reverse themselves.

    Unless, of course, the Democrats never won in 2006 and 2008, Trudeau was never re-elected in 1980 and 1974, MacKenzie King never rebounded in the 1930's, Sarkozy was never elected in 2007, and David Cameron went down to heavy defeat in 2010. I mean, once a trend is set, it can't be changed, right? Gosh no.

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  8. Rick Barnes,

    I agree. Iggy needs to speak out more, especially more than he has.

    wilson,

    The most successful political parties are not ones that are revolutionaries, but ones that co-opt and absorb others.

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  9. "Voluntary unscientific polls?" Sounds like the VOLUNTARY long-form census.

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  10. I did not cite a Poll, only results from 2008 and 2009.

    I stated in 2008 the majority of pollsters under polled the CPC numbers and over polled the Liberals. (Those are facts not open for debate)

    A pattern or a trend is something to look for but without actual results?

    Most pollsters will agree a snapshot is not important. Take a look at the individual Pollster for six months+ for hints of a trend or shift in their polling.

    What do you see?

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